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COVID-19 - Advice & Information

COVID-19 guidelines 1st April 2022

From Friday 1st April 2022, there are significant changes to the COVID-19 government guidance. I have highlighted the main changes for you below.

  • There will no longer be free universal access to COVID testing, both LFD and PCR, in England.

Adults

  • adults with the symptoms of a respiratory infection, and who have a high temperature or feel unwell, should try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people until they feel well enough to resume normal activities and they no longer have a high temperature

  • adults with a positive COVID-19 test result should try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people for 5 days, which is when they are most infectious. If after 5 days, you still feel unwell and have a temperature then continue to stay at home and avoid people until you are well enough to resume normal activities.

Children

  • children and young people who are unwell and have a high temperature should stay at home and avoid contact with other people. They can go back to school, college or childcare when they no longer have a high temperature, and they are well enough to attend

  • children and young people aged 18 and under with a positive COVID-19 test result should try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people for 3 days, which is when they are most infectious. If after 3 days, they feel well and do not have a high temperature then they can return to school.

Symptoms of COVID-19, flu and common respiratory infections include:

  • continuous cough

  • high temperature, fever or chills

  • loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell

  • shortness of breath

  • unexplained tiredness, lack of energy

  • muscle aches or pains that are not due to exercise

  • not wanting to eat or not feeling hungry

  • headache that is unusual or longer lasting than usual

  • sore throat, stuffy or runny nose

  • diarrhoea, feeling sick or being sick

 

What to do if you are a close contact of someone that has tested positive for COVID-19

People who live in the same household as someone with COVID-19 are at the highest risk of becoming infected because they are most likely to have prolonged close contact. People who stayed overnight in the household of someone with COVID-19 while they were infectious are also at high risk.

If you are a household or overnight contact of someone who has had a positive COVID -19 test result it can take up to 10 days for your infection to develop. It is possible to pass on COVID-19 to others, even if you have no symptoms.

 

You can reduce the risk to other people by taking the following steps:

  • avoid contact with anyone you know who is at higher risk of becoming severely unwell if they are infected with COVID-19, especially those whose immune system means they are at higher risk of serious illness from COVID-19, despite vaccination

  • limit close contact with other people outside your household, especially in crowded, enclosed or poorly ventilated spaces

  • wear a well-fitting face covering made with multiple layers or a surgical face mask if you do need to have close contact with other people, or you are in a crowded place

  • wash your hands frequently with soap and water or use hand sanitiser

If you develop symptoms of a respiratory infection try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people and follow the guidance for people with symptoms see above.

If you are a contact of someone with COVID-19 but do not live with them or did not stay in their household overnight, you are at lower risk of becoming infected.

 

How to reduce the spread of infection with the people you live with if you have COVID-19.

If you have COVID-19, there is a high risk that others in your household will catch it from you. There are several things you can do to reduce the spread of infection in your household.

  1. Limit close contact with others. Spend as little time as possible in communal areas.

  2. Regularly clean frequently touched surfaces and shared rooms like kitchens and bathrooms.

  3. Wash your hands regularly using soap and water, particularly after coughing and sneezing.

  4. Get help where possible from those you live with. Ask for help with cleaning and being brought food safely to avoid unnecessary contact.

  5. Use a face covering if you need to spend time in shared spaces.

  6. Keep rooms well ventilated.

  7. Catch coughs and sneezes in disposable tissues and put them straight in the bin.

 

 

The full guidelines can be found on clicking here

 

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